Women who are incarcerated face greater prejudices, stigma, and discrimination, making rehabilitation more difficult

Justice NV Ramana, Chief Justice of India and Patron-in-Chief of the National Legal Services Authority (NALSA), stated during the 32nd Central Authority Meeting of NALSA that there was a need to establish programmes and services to reintegrate women convicts into society.

While giving the keynote lecture to the newly appointed members of the NALSA Central Authority, Justice Ramana noted that jailed women sometimes experience greater preconceptions, stigma, and discrimination, making rehabilitation a difficult task.”

He went on to say, “As a welfare state, we owe it to women in jail to provide programmes and services that allow them to successfully reintegrate into society on an equal footing with males.

The CJI expressed his delight at seeing the report on the rehabilitation of women convicts and offered a number of measures for their reintegration into society, including “nondiscriminatory access to education and vocational training, dignified and remunerated job.”

During the recently held Lok Adalat on September 11, CJI Ramana commended the legal services authorities for disposing of more than 29.5 lakh cases across 33 states and UTs in the country.

The meeting was co-chaired by Justice U.U. Lalit, Executive Chairman of NALSA.

Justice Lalit brought up the issue of jail overcrowding and emphasised the importance of taking quick action in this regard.

He also mentioned that, because schools had been closed due to the epidemic, children in juvenile homes, observational homes, and children’s homes were in an inconceivable position, where simply one video monitor was not enough to provide basic instruction to children of all ages.

Justice Lalit emphasised the need of utilising the ability and services of law students, saying that by adopting three strategies, law students may bridge the gap and reach the grassroot level of society.

Justice Lalit emphasised the need of utilising the ability and services of law students, saying that by adopting three or four talukas in each district across the country, law students may bridge the gap and reach the grassroot level of society. The main items on the agenda were: consideration of the committee’s report on the best use of technology and artificial intelligence; consideration of the committee’s report on the rehabilitation of women prisoners; implementation and next steps for NALSA’s vision and mission statement 2021-22; and reconstitution of the Committee to look into the issue of revising the recommended fee structure of panel lawyers.

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