School of Law, KIIT Deemed to be University Webinar on Drafting Legal Frameworks for Crime Prevention in the Digital Age: Perspectives & Challenges [NOVEMBER 3RD, 2021; 3:30 PM – 5:

About School of law, KIIT Deemed to be University:

The School of Law, since its establishment in 2007, has been acknowledged and appreciated for providing quality legal education and legal skills training to students drawn from across the nation and abroad. The School is presently ranked 12th in India for 2019, as per the ranking released by the National Institutional Ranking Framework (MHRD, Govt. of India). The Kalinga Institute of Industrial Technology (KIIT), Deemed to be University, has also recently been awarded the Institution of Eminence status by the MHRD, Govt. of India.

The academic framework of the school has always encouraged involvement of its students in curricular and co-curricular development at par with the best Law Schools in India, and in relation to which the School is hosting and organizing a webinar on the topic ‘Drafting Legal Frameworks for Crime Prevention in the Digital Age: Perspectives & Challenges’

Details of the event:

THEME 1: Evaluating Existing Legal Infrastructures for Cyber Crimes-The Pandemic has inevitably resulted in growth of usage of digitalisation. A new culture and lifestyle is adopted throughout the world. A recent analysis by global VPN service provider Nord VPN, India ranked 19th out of 21 nations in the National Privacy Test. Out of the 4 lakh complaints lodged on the Ministry of Home Affairs’ National Cybercrime Reporting Portal, half are related to financial frauds. To prevent crimes and speed up investigations, the central government has made efforts to raise awareness about cybercrime, alerts, improve cyber forensics etc. Websites/platforms have been prepared for complaints against Child Pornography/Child Sexual Abuse Material, rape/gang rape imageries, or sexually explicit. This sub-theme seeks to explore the existing legal structures which are present for preventing and cyber-crime in India. It also seeks to evaluate the existing legal framework and envisage legal reforms which can be adopted to enhance the cyber-crime structure from the draftsman’s perspective.

THEME 2:  Conceptualizing Legal Skeleton for Criminal Procedure & Evidence Collection in the Cyber Age-In India, it is more than ten years since law was passed in India to recognize electronic documents as admissible evidence in a Court of law. The term ‘Electronic Evidence’ signifies a piece of evidence generated by some mechanical or electronic processes which is often relevant in proving or disproving a fact or fact at issue. The necessary amendments were made to the Indian Evidence Act 1872 by the Information Technology Act 2000 (ITA-2000). In the case of electronic documents produced as “Primary Evidence”, the document itself must be produced to the Court. In many cases even in non-electronic documents, a document may be in a language other than the language of the Court in which case it needs to be translated and submitted for the understanding of the Court by an “Expert According to Indian Evidence Act, section 65 refers to “Cases in which secondary evidence relating to documents may be given”. Any such investigation has to cover the following main aspects of cyber forensics for preservation and authentication of evidence.

Electronic evidence and cyber forensics are relatively new areas in cybercrime applications and the law in this area continues to evolve. With the change in law, Indian courts have developed case law regarding reliance on electronic evidence. However cyber forensics and electronic evidence are often areas which require technical application and remain outside the purview of the traditional legislative draftsmen. This sub-theme seeks to explore legal structures which can accommodate an effective legal regime to assimilate cyber forensics and electronic evidence with existing legal structures.

DATE: 3RD NOVEMBER 2021.

PLATFORM: ZOOM MEETINGS

The Conference will be focusing on the following domains:

TechnicalSessionI[Discussion Theme:1] :MR. Sujeet Kumar ,Member of Parliament Rajya Sabha

TechnicalSession2[DiscussiononTheme:2]  Dr Satyajit Mohanty,IPS Chairman, Odisha Public Service Commission

Each session would be succeeded by a 10 minute Q&A session. 

Eligibility:

School of Law, KIIT-DU invites participation from Students of law of 3 years and 5 years course, research scholars, academicians, Advocates and professionals.

Location:

The conference is organized in an online mode and the platform intended to be used for the same is zoom.

Registration process:

The participants are requested to register themselves by clicking the registration link below.

https://forms.gle/krPbRJsKgCrNeUnF6

Important Dates:

§  Deadline for registration- 2ND NOVEMBER 2021 (Till 11:59 P.M)

§  Webinar Date- 3RD NOVEMBER 2021, 3:30 Pm- 5:30 Pm

CONTACT PERSONS

Faculty Co-ordinators- 

1. Ms. Tulishree Pradhan, Faculty In Charge, 

Centre for Study & Research in Legislative Drafting

Email: tulishreepradhan@kls.ac.in

2. Ms. Shreyasi Bhattacharya, Co-Faculty In Charge

 Centre for Study & Research in Legislative Drafting

Email: shreyasi.bhattacharya@kls.ac.in

3. Ms. Zeenat Taher, Faculty Coordinator,

Centre for Study & Research in Legislative Drafting

Email: zeenat.taher@kls.ac.in

4. Mr. Shashank Nande, Faculty Coordinator, 

Centre for Study & Research in Legislative Drafting

Email: shashanknande@nls.ac.in 

Student Convenors:

1.Mr. Ayush Verma, Convenor,

Centre for Study & Research in Legislative Drafting

Email:avayush@gmail.com

2. Mr. Sartak Singh, Co-Convenor

Centre for Study & Research in Legislative Drafting

Email: 1883144@kls.ac.in

P.S. PFA of the Poster of the event.

ABOUT THE TOPIC AND THEME.

Topic: Drafting Legal Frameworks for Crime Prevention in the Digital Age: Perspectives & Challenges

  1. Evaluating Existing Legal Infrastructures for Cyber Crimes

The Pandemic has inevitably resulted in growth of usage of digitalisation. A new culture and lifestyle is adopted throughout the world. A recent analysis by global VPN service provider Nord VPN, India ranked 19th out of 21 nations in the National Privacy Test. Out of the 4 lakh complaints lodged on the Ministry of Home Affairs’ National Cybercrime Reporting Portal, half are related to financial frauds. To prevent crimes and speed up investigations, the central government has made efforts to raise awareness about cybercrime, alerts, improve cyber forensics etc. Websites/platforms have been prepared for complaints against Child Pornography/Child Sexual Abuse Material, rape/gang rape imageries, or sexually explicit.

Apart from the Indian Penal Code, the Information Technology Act of 2000 is now the country’s principal statute for dealing with cybercrime and digital trade. The Act was initially drafted in 2000, then amended in 2008, and finally implemented a year later. The Information Technology (Amendment) Bill of 2008 made changes to a number of provisions pertaining to digital data, electronic devices, and cybercrime. Adopting proper legislation and enforcing cyber laws, as well as a strong institutional structure and worldwide collaboration, are all essential for cyber security.

This sub-theme seeks to explore the existing legal structures which are present for preventing and cyber-crime in India. It also seeks to evaluate the existing legal framework and envisage legal reforms which can be adopted to enhance the cyber-crime structure from the draftsman’s perspective.

  • Conceptualizing Legal Skeleton for Criminal Procedure & Evidence Collection in the Cyber Age

In India, it is more than ten years since law was passed in India to recognize electronic documents as admissible evidence in a Court of law. The term ‘Electronic Evidence’ signifies a piece of evidence generated by some mechanical or electronic processes which is often relevant in proving or disproving a fact or fact at issue. The necessary amendments were made to the Indian Evidence Act 1872 by the Information Technology Act 2000 (ITA-2000). In the case of electronic documents produced as “Primary Evidence”, the document itself must be produced to the Court. In many cases even in non-electronic documents, a document may be in a language other than the language of the Court in which case it needs to be translated and submitted for the understanding of the Court by an “Expert According to Indian Evidence Act, section 65 refers to “Cases in which secondary evidence relating to documents may be given”. Any such investigation has to cover the following main aspects of cyber forensics for preservation and authentication of evidence.

Electronic evidence and cyber forensics are relatively new areas in cybercrime applications and the law in this area continues to evolve. With the change in law, Indian courts have developed case law regarding reliance on electronic evidence. However cyber forensics and electronic evidence are often areas which require technical application and remain outside the purview of the traditional legislative draftsmen. This sub-theme seeks to explore legal structures which can accommodate an effective legal regime to assimilate cyber forensics and electronic evidence with existing legal structures.

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